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What is School For?

This tag is associated with 12 posts

Is it possible to teach attitudes? — Part 12 of Stop Stealing Dreams (What is School For?)

by Seth Godin If you missed Part 11, click HERE. 12. Is it possible to teach attitudes? The notion that an organization could teach anything at all is a relatively new one. Traditionally, society assumed that artists, singers, artisans, writers, scientists, and alchemists would find their calling, then find a mentor, and then learn their craft. It … Continue reading

To efficiently run a school, amplify fear (and destroy passion) — Part 11 of Stop Stealing Dreams (What is School For?)

by Seth Godin If you missed Part 10, click HERE. 11. To efficiently run a school, amplify fear (and destroy passion) School’s industrial, scaled-up, measurable structure means that fear must be used to keep the masses in line. There’s no other way to get hundreds or thousands of kids to comply, to process that many … Continue reading

Frederick J. Kelly and your nightmares — Part 10 of Stop Stealing Dreams (What is School For?)

by Seth Godin If you missed Part 9, click HERE. 10. Frederick J. Kelly and your nightmares In 1914, a professor in Kansas invented the multiple-choice test. Yes, it’s less than a hundred years old. There was an emergency on. World War I was ramping up, hundreds of thousands of new immigrants needed to be … Continue reading

Three Legacies of Horace Mann — Part 9 of Stop Stealing Dreams (What is School For?)

by Seth Godin If you missed Part 8, click HERE. 9. Three legacies of Horace Mann As superintendent of schools in Massachusetts, Mann basically invented the public school. Except he called it a common school, because a key goal was to involve the common man and raise the standards of the culture. Right from the … Continue reading

Is School a Civic Enterprise? — Part 8 of Stop Stealing Dreams (What is School For?)

by Seth Godin If you missed Part 7, click HERE. 8. Is school a civic enterprise? At the heart of Horace Mann’s push for public schooling for all was a simple notion: we build a better society when our peers are educated. Democracy was pretty new, and the notion of putting that much power into … Continue reading

Mass Production Desires To Produce Mass — Part 7 of Stop Stealing Dreams (What is School For?)

by Seth Godin If you missed Part 6, click HERE. 7. Mass production desires to produce mass That statement seems obvious, yet it surprises us that schools are oriented around the notion of uniformity. Even though the workplace and civil society demand variety, the industrialized school system works to stamp it out. The industrialized mass … Continue reading

Changing What We Get, Because We’ve Changed What We Need — Part 6 of Stop Stealing Dreams (What is School For?)

by Seth Godin If you missed Part 5, click HERE. 6. Changing what we get, because we’ve changed what we need If school’s function is to create the workers we need to fuel our economy, we need to change school, because the workers we need have changed as well. The mission used to be to … Continue reading

Changing What We Get, Because We’ve Changed What We Need — Part 6 of Stop Stealing Dreams (What is School For?)

by Seth Godin If you missed Part 5, click HERE. 6. Changing what we get, because we’ve changed what we need If school’s function is to create the workers we need to fuel our economy, we need to change school, because the workers we need have changed as well. The mission used to be to … Continue reading

Column A or Column B? — Part 5 of Stop Stealing Dreams (What is School For?)

by Seth Godin If you missed Part 4, click HERE. 5. Column A and Column B Aware Caring Committed Creative Goal-setting Honest Improvising Incisive Independent Informed Initiating Innovating Insightful Leading Strategic Supportive ——————————————- > or Obedient Which column do you pick? Whom do you want to work for or work next to? Whom do you … Continue reading

Stop Stealing Dreams (What is School For?) — Part 4

by Seth Godin If you missed Parts 2 & 3, click HERE. 4. What is school for? It seems a question so obvious that it’s hardly worth asking. And yet there are many possible answers. Here are a few (I’m talking about public or widespread private education here, grade K through college): To create a … Continue reading

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