FAQ: Where To Find Arrowheads In Kansas?

Where are most arrowheads found?

Most arrowheads are found on the surface of the ground, but if you find a few in close proximity to each other, many arrowhead hunters will start digging. You might find more, but here’s where it gets tricky: You might be in a sacred place like an Indian burial ground.

Where can I find arrowheads in creeks?

Walk creeks and look for unnatural colored rocks and shapes. In some cases, natives used non-local stone like obsidian, which makes the points stand out. Flowing water sifts gravel into different sizes along gravel bars. Look for points in gravel bars where rocks are similar in size to the points you’re hoping to find.

Where can I dig for arrowheads?

Places near overhangs, rivers, lakes, and springs are the best places to find arrowheads. I have had the most luck finding arrowheads reasonably near rather than in or right beside rivers. A camp would have been set up near a river but on high ground, away from potential flooding.

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Is finding arrowheads illegal?

All artifacts found on public lands are protected by state and federal laws*. It is illegal and unethical to collect artifacts on public lands. Artifacts include anything made or used by humans including arrowheads and flakes, pottery, basketry, rock art, bottles, coins, metal pieces, and even old cans.

Are arrowheads worth any money?

Since they are so common, you won’t be able to sell a typical arrowhead for much. However, some arrowheads are worth much more than others. An arrowhead can be worth $20,000 in the best cases, even though it might only be worth $5, and an average arrowhead is only worth about $20.

How deep should I dig for arrowheads?

Most arrowheads that people find are on the surface or close to the surface, not deep under it. The typical depth is shallow, not deep. Some people find arrowheads deeper in the ground in exceptional cases, but you might never dig deeply for arrowheads. It is not usually ok to dig where you are looking for artifacts.

Why are there so many arrowheads in creeks?

The reason there are so many projectile points to be found, even after centuries of determined collecting, is that the technology is a very old one: people have been making points to hunt animals for over 200,000 years.

How do you identify a Clovis point?

Clovis points are wholly distinctive. Chipped from jasper, chert, obsidian and other fine, brittle stone, they have a lance-shaped tip and (sometimes) wickedly sharp edges. Extending from the base toward the tips are shallow, concave grooves called “flutes” that may have helped the points be inserted into spear shafts.

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How do you identify arrowheads?

In case it’s stemless, see if it’s fluted or not. If it’s scored, determine if it’s indented in the side or from the corner. The area and the configuration of the pointed arrowhead are sufficient to limit your options to just 12 potential types.

What is the most valuable arrowhead?

The most expensive arrowhead ever sold went for $276,000. It was both prehistoric and made of green obsidian, a rare stone.

What does it mean to find an arrowhead?

The arrowhead has been around much longer, dating back to the Stone Age and has been found all over the world. Native Americans believe an arrowhead represents a symbol of protection and strength. An arrowhead also acts as a symbol of courage.

How old are my arrowheads?

Pointed tools made of stone have been invented during the later Acheulean period, around 400,000 – 200,000 years ago by the Homo erectus in Africa. The age of the earliest arrowheads found is around 65,000 years old when the bow and arrow technology was first introduced.

Is it illegal to dig for Indian artifacts?

Many laws forbid the taking of Native American artifacts from Indian and federal land, including national forests, parks and Bureau of Land Management land, unless granted a permit to do so.

What is a Dalton Arrowhead?

The Dalton Tradition is a Late Paleo-Indian and Early Archaic projectile point tradition. These points appeared in most of Southeast North America around 10,000–7,500 BC.

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