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Editorials

What Thousands of Magical Girls Have to Say About Middle School

Magical girl Madoka Kaname faces off against the evil witch named Walpurgisnacht. Art Credit: AyukiUtau on Deviant Art

Magical girl Madoka Kaname faces off against the evil witch named Walpurgisnacht. Art Credit: AyukiUtau on Deviant Art

This evening, my daughter told me one of my blog posts — Magical Girls: Why I Am No Longer The Parent Of A Public School Student — had gone viral on Tumbler. Although I wrote this piece early last fall, one of the magical girls discovered it just three days ago and has spread the word. In the last three days, more than 25,000 views and almost 7,000 comments. Many of the girls said they were in tears identifying with my daughter’s experience in her public middle school. And I am in tears reading their testimony about how public school affected them at that age. The magical girls say, “Go read her blog post.” I say, “Go read their comments.”

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The KC Education Enterprise has a new sister site, KC Education Research Updates, with occasional news from researchers and neuroscientists of interest to educators.

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About jwmartinez

JoLynne is a journalist and educator. She holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Kansas and a Master of Arts in Teaching from Park University and is certified to teach high school journalism and English. Former employment includes work for Cable News Network and the University of Missouri-Kansas City in addition to freelancing for clients such as the Kansas City Star and The Pitch.

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